DDAVP

THE SAFETY OF NOCDURNA (DESMOPRESSIN) DURING PREGNANCY OR BREASTFEEDING

The information provided below is for readers based in the United States of America. Readers outside of the United States of America should seek the information from local sources.

THIS MEDICATION CAN CAUSE HARM TO YOUR BABY:
Nocdurna is not recommended for the treatment of frequent nighttime urination in pregnant women. Frequent nighttime urination (nocturia) during pregnancy is typically a result of normal changes that occur in your body after you become pregnant. According to the FDA, nocturia caused by pregnancy does not require treatment with Nocdurna. Your doctor will determine which medications are medically necessary during your pregnancy.

What is Nocdurna (desmopressin)?

Nocdurna contains the active ingredient desmopressin and is available as dissolvable tablets that are placed under the tongue. This medication is only available by prescription.

What is Nocdurna (desmopressin) used to treat?

Nocdurna is used to treat nocturia, or frequent nighttime urination, in adults who get up at least twice each night to urinate. Typically, the body produces less urine at night so that you can get 6 to 8 hours of uninterrupted sleep. Getting up frequently during the night to urinate may disrupt sleep cycles and prevent you from getting a good night’s rest.

Other forms of desmopressin may be used to treat different conditions that are unrelated to nocturia. If you are taking desmopressin to treat another health problem, talk to your pregnancy care provider.

How does Nocdurna (desmopressin) work?

Nocdurna contains desmopressin, which is a synthetic (man made) version of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). ADH is a hormone naturally produced by your brain. It reduces the amount of water eliminated by your kidneys and decreases urination. Since Nocdurna is a synthetic form of ADH, it helps reduce frequent urination. Nocdurna is typically taken 1 hour before bedtime to lower the number of times that you wake up in the night to urinate.

If I am taking Nocdurna (desmopressin), can it harm my baby?

Nocdurna is not recommended for the treatment of frequent nighttime urination in pregnant women. Frequent nighttime urination during pregnancy is very common. It is usually due to normal changes that occur in your body after you become pregnant. Per FDA recommendations, nocturia caused by pregnancy does not require treatment with Nocdurna. About 80% to 95% of expecting moms experience frequent urination, needing to urinate more than 7 times during the day and at least twice at night, at some point during their pregnancy. Frequent nighttime urination, in particular, is very common in expecting moms. In a survey of 256 pregnant women, 86% reported having frequent nighttime urination by the 3rd trimester. You can read more about frequent urination during pregnancy here.

Bottom line: Nocdurna is not recommended for the treatment of frequent nighttime urination in pregnant women. Frequent nighttime urination during pregnancy is typically a result of normal changes that occur in your body after you become pregnant. Your doctor will determine which medications are medically necessary during your pregnancy.

If I am taking Nocdurna (desmopressin) and become pregnant, what should I do?

If you become pregnant while taking Nocdurna, you should contact your doctor immediately. Your doctor will determine if your medications need to be adjusted.

If I am taking Nocdurna (desmopressin), can I safely breastfeed my baby?

Your doctor will determine if treatment with Nocdurna is medically necessary and if breastfeeding should be continued. Several factors should be considered in making this determination, including the health benefits of breastfeeding, the mom’s medical need for Nocdurna, and the potential risks to the baby from continued treatment with Nocdurna. No studies have looked at the safety of Nocdurna while nursing. A small study described breastfeeding moms who used desmopressin nasal spray. Small amounts of the medication passed into breast milk. Due to the lack of data, some experts have recommended exercising caution before giving Nocdurna to breastfeeding women, especially those nursing a newborn or premature baby.

Bottom line: New moms who are taking Nocdurna should consult their doctor prior to nursing. The active ingredient in Nocdurna, desmopressin, may pass into breast milk in small amounts. Nocdurna has not been studied in breastfeeding moms.

If I am taking Nocdurna (desmopressin), will it be more difficult to get pregnant?

No studies have looked at the effects of Nocdurna on fertility in men or women. Animal studies in male and female rats given high doses of desmopressin showed no evidence of impaired fertility.

If I am taking Nocdurna (desmopressin), what should I know?

Nocdurna is not recommended for the treatment of frequent nighttime urination in expecting moms. Frequent nighttime urination is typically a result of normal changes that occur in your body after you become pregnant. The FDA has indicated that nocturia caused by pregnancy does not require treatment with Nocdurna.

New moms who are taking Nocdurna should consult their doctor prior to nursing. The active ingredient in Nocdurna, desmopressin, may pass into breast milk in small amounts. No studies have looked at the safety of Nocdurna while breastfeeding.

If I am taking any medication, what should I know?

This report provides a summary of available information about the use of Nocdurna (desmopressin) during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Content is from the product label unless otherwise indicated.

You may find Pregistry's expert reports about various disorders and the medications used to treat them here.  Additional information can also be found in the links below. 

For more information about Nocdurna (desmopressin) during and after pregnancy, contact http://www.womenshealth.gov/ (800-994-9662 [TDD: 888-220-5446]) or check the following links:

Lexicomp: Desmopressin: Drug information

U.S. National Library of Medicine: Urinating more at night

U.S. National Library of Medicine: Diabetes Insipidus

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Last Updated: 18-12-2019
General information

It is very common for women to worry about having a miscarriage or giving birth to a child with a birth defect while they are pregnant. Many decisions that women make about their health during pregnancy are made with these concerns in mind.

For many women these concerns are very real. As many as 1 in 5 pregnancies end in a miscarriage, and 1 in 33 babies are born with a birth defect. These rates are considered the background population risk, which means they do not take into consideration anything about the health of the mom, the medications she is taking, or the family history of the mom or the baby’s dad. A number of different things can increase these risks, including taking certain medications during pregnancy.

It is known that most medications, including over-the-counter medications, taken during pregnancy do get passed on to the baby. Fortunately, most medicines are not harmful to the baby and can be safely taken during pregnancy. But there are some that are known to be harmful to a baby’s normal development and growth, especially when they are taken during certain times of the pregnancy. Because of this, it is important to talk with your doctor or midwife about any medications you are taking, ideally before you even try to get pregnant.

If a doctor other than the one caring for your pregnancy recommends that you start a new medicine while you are pregnant, it is important that you let them know you are pregnant.

If you do need to take a new medication while pregnant, it is important to discuss the possible risks the medicine may pose on your pregnancy with your doctor or midwife. They can help you understand the benefits and the risks of taking the medicine.

Ultimately, the decision to start, stop, or change medications during pregnancy is up to you to make, along with input from your doctor or midwife. If you do take medications during pregnancy, be sure to keep track of all the medications you are taking.