Heart & Blood Condition

Expert reports about Heart & Blood Condition


INFORMATION FOR WOMEN WHO HAVE A VENOUS EMBOLISM DURING PREGNANCY OR BREASTFEEDING

                                                                                                                                                

What is a venous embolism during pregnancy?

The term venous embolism can apply to any condition resulting from a venous embolus – an object, such as a blood clot, a gas bubble, a piece of fat, or a drop of amniotic fluid – being generated in, or entering, the venous system and traveling in the bloodstream until it lodges in a blood vessel that is too small to allow it to pass. Fat emboli are rare during pregnancy but can occur in the setting of bone fracture. Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is rare, but pregnancy is the only time when it can occur. Venous gas emboli can occur due to air being injected into a vein, but this is rare. Venous gas emboli also can occur as part of decompression sickness (DCS), which can occur if you go SCUBA diving (which you should not do while pregnant) and ascend too quickly. DCS also can occur when you ascend quickly in an aircraft, but only under very special circumstances for most women during pregnancy. Generally, the concern about venous embolism during pregnancy centers on a condition known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), characterized by the formation of a blood clot in a vein that may give rise to an embolus.


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