Heart & Blood Condition

Expert reports about Heart & Blood Condition


INFORMATION FOR WOMEN WHO HAVE HYPOXIA DURING PREGNANCY OR BREASTFEEDING

                                                                                                                                                

What is hypoxia during pregnancy?

Technically, the term hypoxia either refers to a low supply of oxygen (O2) in the environment which happens when you are on a mountain or flying in an aircraft where the O2 partial pressure is significantly lower than what it is at sea level, or it refers to a low concentration of O2 in a body tissue. In practice, hypoxia in tissues throughout the body is used interchangeably with hypoxemia, meaning a lower-than-normal amount or concentration of O2 in arterial blood, defined based on either the O2 partial pressure in arterial blood (PaO2) or the percentage of hemoglobin (Hb) that is carrying O2 (called oxygen saturation or “O2 sat”). For a person breathing sea-level air, which has a total pressure of 760 mmHg and an O2 partial pressure of 160 mmHg, PaO2 normally ranges from 75 or 80 mmHg up to 100 or 105 mmHg. This means that you will be considered hypoxic, if your PaO2 is below 75 or 80 mmHg, depending on which lab tests your arterial blood. O2 saturation is normally above 95 percent (usually, it’s at least 97 percent). People below 90 percent are always called hypoxic, but sometimes values from 90-94 percent are called hypoxic, or mildly hypoxic.


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