Heart & Blood Condition

Expert reports about Heart & Blood Condition


INFORMATION FOR WOMEN WHO HAVE DISSEMINATED INTRAVASCULAR COAGULATION (DIC) DURING PREGNANCY OR BREASTFEEDING

                                                                                                                                                

What is disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) during pregnancy?

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a condition that starts with excessive clotting of blood. As the clotting continues, this uses up supplies of platelets and clotting proteins, resulting in the opposite of clotting, namely too much bleeding. It is a rare condition, but it can happen during pregnancy, especially triggered by other pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome, placental abruption, placenta previa, septic abortion, intrauterine infection, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, peripartum hemorrhage, intrauterine fetal demise, and amniotic fluid embolism. DIC also can be triggered by infection or other situations in which there is inflammation, by an uncontrolled drop in core body temperature (accidental hypothermia), burns, pancreatitis, snake venom, trauma, surgery, and cancer.


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