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Weaning Off Toddler

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  • Last Post 11 February 2019
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Britney posted this 11 February 2019

Hi Ladies,

I been trying to wean off my almost 2 year old daughter from breastfeeding. She mostly nurses for comfort and to go to sleep. However, I just found out I'm pregnant and now I really want to hurry the wean off process. I know this is going to be very hard emotionally for the both of us, so any tip or advise would be greatly appreciated. 

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Bojan posted this 12 February 2019

I am going to encourage you to go on and start weaning. According to the World Health Organization and UNICEF recommend until 2 years of age for a child can start proper weaning.

Sharon posted this 12 February 2019


If she's getting most of her calories from you, weaning will mean she's hungry but hasn't become accustomed to seeing food as the way to satisfy her hunger, which will mean frustration all around. Focus on helping her explore solid food so she learns to enjoy it.

Madeleine posted this 12 February 2019

For some kids, this won't make a difference--they'll just ask. But try this because for others, even those who habitually nurse at a certain time of day, if you simply move on with the schedule without offering, nursing won't occur to them.

Zella posted this 12 February 2019

I think the sight of your breast triggers your child's longing to nurse. This will last at least a year after she's weaned, and maybe longer. This isn't the time to wear low cut tops or sleep naked (presuming that your child ever awakens at night, as many do.) Don't worry, this won't last forever.

Adelinda posted this 12 February 2019

Most little ones want to nurse after they fall and hurt themselves. But that teaches them to "stuff" their feelings. Instead, when your baby or toddler gets hurt, hold him and empathize with him ("That really hurt! Tell me about it..."), helping him to experience the pain and to express it to you with his tears. If he asks to nurse, say  ..

If you make a practice of this, your child will learn how healing his tears are. He won't ask to use nursing as a "pacifier" when he has big feelings, and so won't "need" it so desperately to manage his emotions as time goes on.

Bojan posted this 12 February 2019

If your little one has been managing her emotions with nursing, those feelings will now come up in other ways -- whining, grumpiness, reactivity, helplessness. Accept all your child's emotions with compassion and patience; she just needs to cry in the safety of your loving attention and those feelings will dissipate. Remember also that she's grieving. For your child, weaning is a loss. She's giving up something beloved. She'll need to cry, to tell you how sad that makes her. Your job is to NOT feel defensive because you are expecting a baby.

Laura Neal posted this 12 February 2019

If you gently suggest other activities at those times when she wants to nurse, you'll find that the number of times you nurse in a day greatly diminishes. Offer a drink of water. Go outside to see if there are any butterflies. Discover a sticker that needs some paper. Become a bucking bronco who needs a rider.

Laura Neal posted this 12 February 2019

Or you can reduce the amount of time your child nurses at each session, then giving up that session will be easier on your child. To do this, respond to your child's request to nurse by saying "Ok, do you want ten nummies?" (Or whatever his special word is.) After he latches on, count from ten down to one, and then say "All done! Blast off!" If he insists on nursing on both sides, that's fine -- just count down from ten on each side.

Kim posted this 12 February 2019

You can tell your toddler or preschooler that he's too big to breastfeed, but he still wants to, he feels ashamed. Instead, explain that the nursies need to rest because you are expecting his/her baby brother or sister.

Kim posted this 12 February 2019

As you have said this is emotionally hard but consider yourself and your child to be "moving toward weaning" as you embark on this process.

Tara posted this 12 February 2019

What worked for me was just cutting down one feeding at a time and replacing with a cup of water or milk. We started with the afternoon feeding, and after a few more days, cut out another feeding. It'll be hard but she'll figure it out! 

Deborah posted this 12 February 2019

I'd say use a paci or a blanket instead of nursing for comfort. Let her pick something, give her a choice. Wean her off only 1 feeding every couple of days, then another one. You'll do great, it can be hard but extra time with books or quality time can help.

Firhadi posted this 12 February 2019

Ok this might come off weird but I promise you this will work! My 2 yr old daughter was attached to breastfeeding & I thought I would never be able to ween her. I tried everything from mixing flower and water and covering my nipples with it and she wiped them off and proceeded to go in lol. After 6 months of trying I got tired of being bit and her griping my Nips in between her teeth πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈπŸ™„, I decided to put 2 bandages on both of my nips to cover them completely. When she 1st reached for them I told her that mommy had a boo boo.  She cried for a few minutes and I introduced the bottle. It became her best friend. The crying lasted for 3 days after that waa laa it was like magic. I wore them for a week just to be on the safe side. After the week was complete she would catch me jumping in the shower and say mommy boo boo? Lol eventually boo boo turned into Ewww that’s nasty. Needless to say I weened her off at 15 months 😝

user4 posted this 11 May 2019

Couldn't be more simple, right? LOL! I will have to try this! I am thinking about weaning my LO too!

For some kids, this won't make a difference--they'll just ask. But try this because for others, even those who habitually nurse at a certain time of day, if you simply move on with the schedule without offering, nursing won't occur to them.

user4 posted this 11 May 2019

Am I the only one feeling sad reading some of these comments?! I want to wean my LO, but I also don't! It is such a precious bonding moment for the two of us! I guess it's hard to give up a habit we've learned for the last 13 months. πŸ˜’ 

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