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Kids - How to get them to want to help with the chores?

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  • Last Post 16 September 2019
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Janice posted this 16 September 2019

Ok so my kids are still young, but old enough to start helping with the chores. Any suggestions on how I can get them to actually want to pitch in? All I've gotten so far is a bunch of complaining.

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Courtney posted this 16 September 2019

My son who is 2 (going on 3 in October) loves to help with chores. He helps with laundry, dishes and general cleaning. I honestly don't know what made him want to start helping, but every time we do chores we try to make it fun by singing and dancing. 

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Megan posted this 17 September 2019

Invite them to help you at first instead of making it mandatory. We have "contests" to see who can work the fastest. Also with mine if I say "Time to Clean 10!" they have to pick up 10 ten things, you can even time that too. Eventually it will be part of your routine and they won't complain. Don't bribe them, but reward them with a job well done and let them know how important they are to you when they help.

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Janice posted this 17 September 2019

You guys! These are such good ideas! Why didn't i think of them myself? I think I'm going to use the "whoever can work the fastest" lol. They would be able to resist a challenge.

Lassane posted this 17 September 2019

My daughter is 3 and she now enjoys doing few chores that I assigned to her.  I started each one as follows:

1. Asking her to do the chores (pick up toys, organize her room  etc.) right before her favorite activity.  I will say for example " Go clean your room in 10 before we read your favorite book".  I then start counting 1 to 10.

2. Congratulating, complementing her when completed and finally rewarding her with my original promise.


Jenn posted this 18 September 2019

What worked for us was making a list of a bunch of chores, and asking my child which 3 she wanted to do.  This way she felt involved in making the choice and wasn't be forced to do something. 

Katy posted this 18 September 2019

I don't think you can get by without some complaining ;-) Sometimes reward systems help. We also just let the kids know that we work together to keep our family happy and healthy.

Megan posted this 19 September 2019

I have also seen where you write chores on Popsicle sticks and put them in a jar. That way they "get what they get" but you can put some fun stuff in there too. It might help to have a cleaning song that you can dance and sing along with while you work.

Becky posted this 20 September 2019

Start when they are little. I fill a sink with tupperware and lots of soapy suds. They love it. No fear of them breaking the tupperware and they also slowly develop a willing spirit when it comes to pitching in.

Roxy posted this 22 September 2019

My sister has a chore chart for her oldest and if he does certain things he will get a sticker and if he gets enough sticker at the end of 2 weeks then he is allowed to pick a treat or a family outing. He is doing very well with it!

Nadia posted this 22 September 2019

Lots of great ideas here. Positive words help, rewards systems go a long way and starting with small chores is important instead of jumping straight to the big stuff like cutting the grass.

Estelle posted this 14 October 2019

My LO is still young, but I try to get her to always help me clean up her toys and she has been trying to sweep to!

Juliet posted this 14 October 2019

My son is more apt to helping with chores if they are messes he didn't create. He'll whine and complain about cleaning his room, but has zero issues vacuuming. I try to give him chores that I don't necessarily have to fight with him on (other than his room) if I can help. The game/contest idea is great. We've done that. I've also let him have his pick of music while we clean up together. I will also reward him if he's cleaning up messes he didn't create, especially is he does it without asking. 

Stacy posted this 15 October 2019

Making it into a game or competition works for us!  Or you can try using rewards, but I wouldn't want to make the rewards continue forever.

Brianna posted this 15 October 2019

I plan on doing a chore chart, and having my kids pick the rewards.

Wendy posted this 20 October 2019

We've also done a chore chart and it has a reward system attached. That way they can visually see what their goal is. 

Sadie posted this 23 October 2019

I try to make it as fun as possible, but it's hard! And sometimes I just don't want to deal with the complaining so I do it myself.

Elena posted this 23 October 2019

My son is at an age where chores are just not a fun thing for him. I handle it a few ways. 1. I remind him that it is important to be organized. 2. He is motivated to have everything clean if he wants to have fun and play, this is my way of showing him how to prioritize and be self-sufficient. 3. I tell him what a good job  he did when finished and I always make it a point to point out how good it feels to have a clean environment. 4. We teach him that our family is a team and everybody has to help in the house and do their part. Even though he doesn't like to do it he is quite helpful without my even having to ask. He does it because he agrees it feels good to have a clean environment even though he feels the actual cleaning process is no fun to him. He also does it on his own when he's in a good mood to surprise us while we sleep in the morning. I must be doing something right.

Christine posted this 05 November 2019

Chore chart?  My kids are rewarded when they consistently help. Only good behavior is rewarded in our household, but our limits are clear and they rarely go beyond with acting up.

Lori posted this 05 November 2019

We have a "fuzzies system". I bought a ton of those 1.5" colorful craft pom poms and put them in a large clear plastic container (re-used an old pretzel container from Aldis actually). Every time they do a chore, get caught being nice or doing something good, finish school without complaining (we homeschool), etc they get to pick out a fuzzy (or 2 if they were really good) and then put it in their own individual jars. They can then use the fuzzies (like money) to purchase screen time, snack, piece of gum or decide to save them up for something big (like a trip to the dollar store or watch a movie with popcorn, etc). It's worked well and they absolutely love it! I like that they are learning that good choices = positive consequences and the value of saving "money" for something you really want rather than temporary little wants.  

Lori posted this 05 November 2019

We have a "fuzzies system". I bought a ton of those 1.5" colorful craft pom poms and put them in a large clear plastic container (re-used an old pretzel container from Aldis actually). Every time they do a chore, get caught being nice or doing something good, finish school without complaining (we homeschool), etc they get to pick out a fuzzy (or 2 if they were really good) and then put it in their own individual jars. They can then use the fuzzies (like money) to purchase screen time, snack, piece of gum or decide to save them up for something big (like a trip to the dollar store or watch a movie with popcorn, etc). It's worked well and they absolutely love it! I like that they are learning that good choices = positive consequences and the value of saving "money" for something you really want rather than temporary little wants.  

Lynn posted this 06 November 2019

My son is only 1 but I have him wanting to help me clean up already. I just ask him excitedly to help me and high five him and tell him thank you. He loved it

Maggie posted this 06 November 2019

Chores are mandatory in my house

Danielle posted this 07 November 2019

Rewards Rewards Rewards!  But if that doesn't work my kids know if their toys aren't pick up and I bring out the leaf trash bag..... they will have no more toys haha.  

jody posted this 25 November 2019

I've noticed my little likes to help me, if I ask her to do something alone, she isn't as interested. 

Rebecca posted this 12 March 2020

My daughter is money motivated when it comes to chores. The only reason that is really working though is because she is also now required to use an envelope system too and if she wants something like a toy, outside of anything I'd normally buy or a time for gifts, she has to use her money. She gets excited to budget and help out. Now there are a few required chores that if those aren't done, she wont get paid for others. For example, she has to have her bathroom, which is also the guest bath, clean at all times and she is responsible for taking the laundry room trash and recycling out on Monday. Shes 7!

Zoe posted this 12 March 2020

I have a friend who uses "gems." Each kid has a small vase/container and they each have little gems. When they do chores or are generally good people she puts gems in their vase. At the end of each month they get to "buy" little treats and toys from a basket with their gems. Her kids are grown and they still talk about it to this day. 

Janessa posted this 12 March 2020

I started giving my 5-year-old a few chores. She completed them for a day and then stopped. What do I do? 

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