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Gestational diabetes

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  • Last Post 12 February 2019
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Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

Hi guys, I see some people asked some questions about gestational diabetes so I decided to start a thread on it. I'm new here I hope we learn one or two things from this. If you have suggestions and contributions please share


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Priya posted this 01 December 2019

I've been asked to do the glucose test 2 times. The one hour levels were high, and the 3 hour- one of the reading was high. Apparently this makes my case borderline. How to be careful? do i just assume i have GD and follow a diet?

Michelle posted this 18 February 2019

Thanks for all the info!

Jane posted this 17 February 2019

Thank you Hannah for gathering all of this information and sharing it with us. I will be completing my glucose test soon and I hope everything turns out well. 

Ashley posted this 14 February 2019

Lots of good information here! 

Olivia posted this 14 February 2019

Keep a positive mindset I'm sure you're going to be fine

I have heard horrible stories about the glucose test I have to take at 28 weeks. Not looking forward to it!.  Our baby is measuring larger than normal so I am worried I have GD.

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Cathy posted this 14 February 2019

I have heard horrible stories about the glucose test I have to take at 28 weeks. Not looking forward to it!.  Our baby is measuring larger than normal so I am worried I have GD.

Carie posted this 14 February 2019

I don't want this, I don't want to miss out on being able to eat anything I want, ice creams!!

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Megan posted this 14 February 2019

This condition is common among PCOS patients, I'm sure with the help of a nutritionist, your family and friends, you'd come out fine if you find yourself in that condition

Aneez posted this 14 February 2019

God this is a nightmare . Ladies please eat healthy.i failed my 1 hr glucose test. I had to come back fast the next day & drink one of those awful drinks for 3 hours. 🤦🏽‍♀Just imagine fasting and all you can have is that nasty drink eww

Susan posted this 14 February 2019

Wow this is really enlightening, thank you

B posted this 12 February 2019

I agree! It’s important to eat healthy & exercise frequently during pregnant.

From these I think if we watch our glucose intake and exercise more during pregnancy, gestational diabetes shouldn't be our problem

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Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

From these I think if we watch our glucose intake and exercise more during pregnancy, gestational diabetes shouldn't be our problem

Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

Possible gestational diabetes complications for the baby:

Unlike other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes generally does not cause birth defects. Birth defects usually originate sometime during the first trimester of pregnancy. They are more likely in women with pregestational diabetes, who may have changes in blood glucose during that time. Women with gestational diabetes generally have normal blood sugar levels during the critical first trimester.

The complications of gestational diabetes are usually manageable and preventable. 

The key to prevention is careful control of blood sugar levels just as soon as the diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made.

Infants of mothers with gestational diabetes are vulnerable to several chemical imbalances, such as low serum calcium and low serum magnesium levels, but, in general, the major problems of gestational diabetes include the following

  • Macrosomia 
    Macrosomia refers to a condition whereby the baby is considerably larger than normal. All of the nutrients the fetus receives come directly from the mother's blood. If the maternal blood has too much glucose, the pancreas of the fetus senses the high glucose levels and produces more insulin in an attempt to use this glucose. The fetus converts the extra glucose to fat. Even when the mother has gestational diabetes, the fetus is able to produce all the insulin it needs. The combination of high blood glucose levels from the mother and high insulin levels in the fetus results in large deposits of fat which causes the fetus to grow excessively large.

  • Birth injury 
    Birth injury may occur due to the baby's large size and difficulty being born.

  • Hypoglycemia 
    Hypoglycemia refers to low blood sugar in the baby immediately after delivery. This problem occurs if the mother's blood sugar levels have been consistently high, causing the fetus to have a high level of insulin in its circulation. After delivery, the baby continues to have a high insulin level, but it no longer has the high level of sugar from its mother, resulting in the newborn's blood sugar level becoming very low. The baby's blood sugar level is checked after birth, and if the level is too low, it may be necessary to give the baby glucose intravenously (IV or into a vein).

  • Respiratory distress (difficulty breathing) 
    Too much insulin or too much glucose in a baby's system may delay lung maturation and cause respiratory difficulties in babies. This is more likely if they are born before 37 weeks of pregnancy.


Culled from: stanfordchildrens.org


Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

Treatment for gestational diabetes:

Specific treatment for gestational diabetes will be determined by your physician or midwife based on:

  • Your age, overall health, and medical history

  • Severity of the disease

  • Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies

  • Expectations for the course of the disease

  • Your opinion or preference

Treatment for gestational diabetes focuses on keeping blood glucose levels in the normal range. Treatment may include:

  • Special diet

  • Exercise

  • Daily blood glucose monitoring

  • Insulin injections or prescription drugs


Culled from: stanfordchildrens.org


Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

How is gestational diabetes diagnosed?

A glucose screening test is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. This test involves drinking a special glucose drink followed by measurement of the blood sugar level one hour later.

If this test shows an increased blood sugar level, a three-hour glucose tolerance test may be done after a few days of following a special diet. If results of the second test are in the abnormal range, gestational diabetes is diagnosed.


Culled fromstanfordchildrens.org

Hannah posted this 12 February 2019


What are the risk factors associated with gestational diabetes?

Although any woman may develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, some of the factors that may increase risk are:

  • Family history of diabetes

  • Obesity

  • Having given birth previously to a very large infant, a stillbirth, or a child with a birth defect

  • Age (women who are older than 25 are at greater risk than younger women)

Although increased glucose in the urine is often included in the list of risk factors, it is not believed to be a reliable indicator for gestational diabetes.


Culled from: stanfordchildrens.org

Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

What causes gestational diabetes?

Although the cause of gestational diabetes is not known, there are some theories as to why it occurs.

The placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water. It also produces a variety of hormones to maintain the pregnancy. Some of these hormones (estrogen, cortisol, and human placental lactogen) can have a blocking effect on insulin, which usually begins about 20 to 24 weeks into the pregnancy.

As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced, and insulin resistance becomes greater. Normally, the pancreas is able to make additional insulin to overcome insulin resistance, but when the production of insulin is not enough to overcome the effect of the placental hormones, gestational diabetes results.


Culled from: stanfordchildrens.org

Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

What is gestational diabetes?

Gestational diabetes is a condition in which the glucose level is elevated and other diabetic symptoms appear during pregnancy in a woman who has not previously been diagnosed with diabetes. In most cases, all diabetic symptoms disappear following delivery. 

However, women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing diabetes later in life, especially if they were overweight before pregnancy.

Unlike other types diabetes, gestational diabetes is not caused by a lack of insulin, but by other hormones that block on the insulin that is produced, a condition referred to as insulin resistance.


Culled from: stanfordchildrens.org

Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

Diabetes that occurs in pregnancy is described as:

Gestational diabetes- when a mother who does not have diabetes develops a resistance to insulin because of the hormones of pregnancy. Women with gestational diabetes may be non-insulin dependent or insulin dependent.

Pregestational diabetes- women who already have diabetes and become pregnant.


Culled from: stanfordchildrens.org

Hannah posted this 12 February 2019

Firstly,

 What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition where the body does not produce enough insulin or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced.

Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. 


Diabetes in pregnancy can have serious consequences for the mother and the growing fetus. The severity of problems often depends on the severity of the mother's diabetic disease, especially if she has vascular (blood vessel) complications and poor blood glucose control.



Culled from: stanfordchildrens.org

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